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Showing posts from September, 2018

Typewritten: Introduction

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The rabbit hole is often pretty shallow, just deep enough to break the ankle.  It grabs you, shakes you about, and leaves a lasting reminder.  This blog is my rabbit hole, my vast network of scattered obsessions, the work of a disorganized artist careening out of control and barely in touch with normalcy.
My primary obsession: Typewriters.  Perfected pieces of ingenious mechanical engineering.  I have alienated myself, becoming a social recluse so that I might be able to harbor more nerdish knowledge about these machines.  It’s not healthy, but neither are Oreos with double cream filling.  Some things are just good for the soul.  I’m not quite sure what drives my passion for these single-purpose, clunky, mechanical devises.  Perhaps it’s my love of beautiful words (can guys like that kind of stuff?), or maybe my strong affinity for mechanics (sounds more masculine).       I began collecting these pieces of history a several years ago, but my interest had begun way before.  It’s become m…

1937 Underwood 6: the Heirloom Project

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In 1937, this machine was purchased brand new by a man who needed to write.  The Underwood 6 was a follow up model to the 5, which is etched into typewriter history as one of the greats.  The 6 is virtually the same machine, with an indented and textured front plate, textured side plates, and a textured paper table.  In subsequent years, the machine pictured barely survived a house fire and a flood which left the machine smoke damaged, and completely solidified with rust.  The restoration process to get it working again required a complete tear down and cleaning, leaving the machine working, but still looking like a piece of history.  The current owner of the machine is an author—the granddaughter of the original owner.


The carriage was the first to come off, entire thing was frozen with rust 
More rust 
More rust....again....it was bad..
The left knob was so frozen up that it had to be the one part I couldn’t fix. 


 The platen end caps were made of copper, and to my surprise, so wer…